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Everybody’s Place and Prescott Creeks

Submitted by August 7, 2012 11:05 am

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Creeks and homelessness may not seem like an obvious connection. Just like creeks and art, or homelessness and art, may not seem like a fit. The connection though is a very important one. One where trash effects water quality, which effects the homeless, which effects in return the levels of trash and water quality.  

Often people who are homeless, or address-less, live in or around the creek areas. In Prescott these people need to be close in to town to access services. They live under bridges, behind trees, in discarded areas where the public often doesn’t see or notice them. The creeks become their homes, their transportation corridors, and along with that the places where they eat, and discard food, bathe, and urinate.

The actions of each of us affect the creeks. From the fertilizers on the gardens, to the oil dripping out of cars, to trash blown/dropped/thrown on the street or trails many things that all of us do affect the creeks. For those living in the waterways the effect may be somewhat different, but more intense and immediate. And for those living in the waterways, the water quality in the creeks affects them in a more direct way than it affects the rest of us.

Prescott Creeks is working on water quality and trash in the creeks through a variety of programs. One Man’s Treasure is our attempt to bring attention to the amount and types of trash found in our creeks.

Everybody’s Place Project is dedicated to creating a community based and supported facility that will improve the quality of life for the homeless, those in jeopardy of becoming homeless and those living in poverty in the Prescott Area. Included in this program are those currently homeless, children just out of foster care, folks out of rehab and anyone else wanting job training or just a place to work and be creative. The focus of the program is to upcycle household trash into functional and decorative items for sale; thus providing training as well as a bit of income.

Using art to spotlight the connection between creeks and homelessness we hope to bring attention to larger environmental and social issues. 

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