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Granite Creek Cleanup 2015

The 2015 Granite Creek Cleanup is Saturday April 18th, 2015. We hope you will to join Prescott Creeks and 500+ of your community neighbors for a morning of fun and service to the creeks. (We’ll even give you a cool t-shirt!) On Saturday, April 18th, this family-friendly event will run from 9:00 to 11:00am. Registration

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Restoring Rivers – Natural Channel Design

March 24-27, 2015, Prescott Creeks and Natural Channel Design hosted 30 restoration practitioners from Arizona, Texas, New Mexico, and Utah in Prescott for a river restoration workshop. Using principles first pioneered by Luna Leopold, and further developed by David Rosgen, and then Tom Moody, the 3 1/2 day workshop introduced participants to the fundamentals of

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Habitat Improvement Through Removal of Invasive Species

In April, Prescott Creeks will once again make a push to control invasive weeds in the Granite Creek Watershed. Our American Conservation Expereince (ACE) crew will be here for 8 days to help us make another push at improving habitat. Not sure what an invasive weed is? Often thought of as just “weeds” these are

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Dirty Martinis for Clean Water Member Event

The evening of Friday, March 6, Prescott Creeks hosted the Dirty Martinis for Clean Water membership event at our office cabin, adjacent the Watson Wood Riparian Preserve. 50+ people gathered to learn more about Prescott Creeks, its mission, and some of the ongoing projects that are in process to improve water quality issues in our

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Public Library Display for March 2015

Prescott Creeks, One Man’s Treasure, and Prescott College are all featured in the Prescott Public Library “Viewerie” for the month of March. Stop in and learn about Prescott Creeks’ accomplishments over the past 25 years, its ongoing collaborations with Prescott College and how One Man’s Treasure supports the missions of both organizations. Join us on

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Peter Pierson Appointed as New Staff

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE February 20, 2015 CONTACT: Michael Byrd Executive Director (928) 445-5669 PRESCOTT CREEKS WELCOMES NEW STAFF Peter Pierson Appointed to Development and Communications Role Prescott Creeks has announced that Peter Pierson has been hired to take on the organization’s development and communications duties. Pierson’s work will engage the community in fostering broader awareness,

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Visitors & Residents

As spring unfurls, it’s been fun to see who is stopping by the Preserve for a visit and which resident species are getting active. As one might expect, it’s been busy out there. This week we’ve had a Great Egert (Ardea alba) visiting a feature we know as Wetland #1.It seems to be doing well

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Phenology Trail

On Tuesday May 3rd, Phenology Trail volunteers and local plant enthusiasts got together in Watson Woods Riparian Preserve for grass workshop led by local experts, Sue Smith. This workshop provided hands on opportunity for the participants to become familiar with local grasses identification, their natural history and phenology. Since it was a gorgeous day in the preserve, it was hard

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Prescott Area Young Professionals Mixer

On Wednesday, January 21, Prescott Creeks hosted the Prescott Area Young Professionals Mixer. 30+ members of the PYP group came together at the Prescott Creeks offices to learn more about Prescott Creeks and its mission to improve water quality in our area. This event provided an opportunity to share ideas and to build relationships between

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Learn How Rivers Work

Prescott Creeks is pleased to collaborate with Natural Channel Design, Inc. on its upcoming workshop: Geomorphic Processes and Restoration of Natural Channels in the Arid Southwest. This introductory workshop on March 24th-27th, 2015 will focus on providing information on how to recognize important streamfeatures, field measurement, and analysis of basic stream dimensions as well as

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Giving Tuesday

We have Thanksgiving Thursday, Black Friday, and Cyber Monday. Now, we have a global day dedicated to giving back, Giving Tuesday. On Tuesday, December 2, 2014, charities, families, businesses, community centers, and students around the world will come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give. It’s a simple idea. Just find

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Green Infrastructure – Location, Location, Location

Two sites were selected for implementing this project. These locations were chosen due to the need for water quality improvements, land ownership, access, and visibility. The Prescott Community Center is located on Rosser, upstream from Granite Creek and Watson Woods Riparian Preserve. Surrounding areas are likely to be built out over the next few years,

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Creating Meanders – How Green Infrastructure Works

‘Green Infrastructure’ is a broad term for features that rely on natural processes such as soil, water, and plants to provide ecosystem services such as a clean water, clean air, wildlife habitat, and temperature regulation. The two Green Infrastructure (GI) projects are taking urban areas and rebuilding them to imitate the drainage and filtration that

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Green Infrastructure

Prescott Creeks, in coordination with the City of Prescott and funded by ADEQ, has been working on two recently project to improve water quality in our creeks. These two projects, located at the Prescott Adult Centre and the corner of Whipple & Miller Valley, are examples of Green Infrastructure. But what is Green Infrastructure? The

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Dalmation Toadflax (Linaria dalmatica)

Dalmation toadflax is a wide spread invasive. The extent of it’s spread can be seen in this map from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Originally brought to North America from the Mediterranean region of Europe as an ornamental, Dalmatian toadflax is currently found in at least 34 states in the U.S. and most of the

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Diffuse Knapweed (Centaurea diffusa)

Diffuse knapweed is an annual or biennial plant , generally growing to between 10 and 60 cm in height. It has a highly branched stem and a large taproot , as well as a basal rosette of leaves with smaller leaves alternating on the upright stems. Flowers are usually white or pink and grow out

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Russian Knapweed (Acroptilon repens)

Like other creeping perennials, the key to Russian knapweed control is to stress the weed and cause it to expend nutrient stores in its root system. An integrated management plan should be developed that places continual stress on the weed. Currently, the best management plan includes cultural control combined with mechanical and/or chemical control techniques.

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Russian Olive (Eleaganus angustifolia)

Acc ording to the National Park Service: Russian-olive is a small, usually thorny shrub or small tree that can grow to 30 feet in height. Its stems, buds, and leaves have a dense covering of silvery to rusty scales. Leaves are egg or lance-shaped, smooth margined, and alternate along the stem. At three years of

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Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea maculosa)

This is often a favorite to hate in the central Arizona highlands. Knapweed is a pioneer species found in recently disturbed sites or openings. Once it has been established at a disturbed site, it continues to spread into the surrounding habitat. This species outcompetes natives through at least three methods: A tap root that sucks up water

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Malta Starthistle (Centaurea melitensis)

Malta starthistle (synonyms: Napa starthistle, tocalote) is an annual invasive weed with foliage and winged stems that are grayish to green in color. Its thistle-like appearance is similar to yellow starthistle (C. solstitialis), but Malta starthistle is distinguished by smaller yellow flowers and longer seedpods that are armed with relatively short spines (less than 1/2

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Sweet Resinbush (Euryops subcarnosus)

From the CA Extension offices: Sweet resinbush (Euryops subcarnosus) is an exotic species from South Africa that was introduced in Arizona during the 1930’s.It was brought here in hopes that it would provide forage for livestock and aid in slowing soil erosion. Potted plants were sent to Civilian Conservation Corps camps in 1935 where they

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Scotch Thistle (Onopordum accanthium)

From the Wikipedia entry on this invasive weed: Onopordum acanthium (Cotton thistle, Scotch thistle), is a flowering plant in the family Asteraceae. It is native to Europe and Western Asia from the Iberian Peninsula east to Kazakhstan, and north to central Scandinavia, and widely naturalised elsewhere.[1][2][3] It is a vigorous biennial plant with coarse, spiny

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Common Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum)

Another invasive species in the Granite Creek Watershed, and mostly in Watson Woods Riparian Preserve, is common teasel. Often used in flower arrangements, this attractive pieces, has found its way into our creeks and is taking over sections of our riparian habitat. According to Wikipedia: The genus name is derived from the word for thirst

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Tamarix (Saltcedar, salt cedar, tamarisk)

Tamarix is perhaps one of our bestter know invasive species. It is found widely throughout the Southwest. The description below comes from Wikipedia, where you can read more in depth on the subject. They are evergreen or deciduous shrubs or trees growing to 1–18 m in height and forming dense thickets. The largest, Tamarix aphylla, is an evergreen tree that can grow to 18

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